Excerpt from the Ebers Papyrus, English version translated from prior German translation.

Even in 1550 B.C. it was understood that the fundamental remedy for an abscess is to drain it.

The Ebers Papyrus, also known as Papyrus Ebers, is an Egyptian medical papyrus of herbal knowledge dating to c. 1550 BC. Among the oldest and most important medical papyri of ancient Egypt, it was purchased at Luxor (Thebes) in the winter of 1873–74 by Georg Ebers. It is currently kept at the library of the University of Leipzig, in Germany.
It is among the earliest records of parasitic infections.
An older English translation can be found here: oilib.uchicago.edu/books/bryan_the_papyrus_ebers_1930.pdf

The Ebers Papyrus, also known as Papyrus Ebers, is an Egyptian medical papyrus of herbal knowledge dating to c. 1550 BC. Among the oldest and most important medical papyri of ancient Egypt, it was purchased at Luxor (Thebes) in the winter of 1873–74 by Georg Ebers. It is currently kept at the library of the University of Leipzig, in Germany.

It is among the earliest records of parasitic infections.

An older English translation can be found here: oilib.uchicago.edu/books/bryan_the_papyrus_ebers_1930.pdf

Three medical students at Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, snapped at a Dean’s reception, in 1885. They were the first woman to get a degree in Western medicine in their respective countries.
More story here: http://www.pri.org/stories/2013-07-15/historical-photos-circulating-depict-women-medical-pioneers
Joshi’s application essays are available online, and may be useful for anyone trying their hand at applying to medical school.

Three medical students at Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, snapped at a Dean’s reception, in 1885. They were the first woman to get a degree in Western medicine in their respective countries.

More story here: http://www.pri.org/stories/2013-07-15/historical-photos-circulating-depict-women-medical-pioneers

Joshi’s application essays are available online, and may be useful for anyone trying their hand at applying to medical school.

mementomoriart:

Physician Struggling With Death for Life (1920)
Print
Ivo Saliger (1894 - 1987)

mementomoriart:

Physician Struggling With Death for Life (1920)

Print

Ivo Saliger (1894 - 1987)

Antonie Philips van Leeuwenhoek

Using his handcrafted microscopes, he was the first to observe and describe single-celled organisms, which he originally referred to as animalcules, and which are now referred to as microorganisms. He was also the first to record microscopic observations of muscle fibers, bacteria, spermatozoa, and blood flow in capillaries (small blood vessels). Leeuwenhoek did not author any books; his discoveries came to light through correspondence with the Royal Society, which published his letters.

The letters are published as "Antony van Leeuwenhoek and his "Little animals"; being some account of the father of protozoology and bacteriology and his multifarious discoveries in these disciplines."

Letters here

vicemag:

We’ve republished 13 old-timey medical illustrations and turned them into a multiple choice test that will challenge your knowledge of terrible diseases. It’s like a BuzzFeed quiz with syphilis!

deathandmysticism:

Leeching of a patient, National Library of Medicine

deathandmysticism:

Leeching of a patient, National Library of Medicine

antiqueart:

Herbert James Draper - Ulysses and the Sirens (1909)

antiqueart:

Herbert James Draper - Ulysses and the Sirens (1909)

michaelmoonsbookshop:

When Doctors Differ FE Weatherly

attractive chromolithograph illustrations by St Clair Simmons

1891