Antonie Philips van Leeuwenhoek

Using his handcrafted microscopes, he was the first to observe and describe single-celled organisms, which he originally referred to as animalcules, and which are now referred to as microorganisms. He was also the first to record microscopic observations of muscle fibers, bacteria, spermatozoa, and blood flow in capillaries (small blood vessels). Leeuwenhoek did not author any books; his discoveries came to light through correspondence with the Royal Society, which published his letters.

The letters are published as "Antony van Leeuwenhoek and his "Little animals"; being some account of the father of protozoology and bacteriology and his multifarious discoveries in these disciplines."

Letters here

vicemag:

We’ve republished 13 old-timey medical illustrations and turned them into a multiple choice test that will challenge your knowledge of terrible diseases. It’s like a BuzzFeed quiz with syphilis!

deathandmysticism:

Leeching of a patient, National Library of Medicine

deathandmysticism:

Leeching of a patient, National Library of Medicine

antiqueart:

Herbert James Draper - Ulysses and the Sirens (1909)

antiqueart:

Herbert James Draper - Ulysses and the Sirens (1909)

michaelmoonsbookshop:

When Doctors Differ FE Weatherly

attractive chromolithograph illustrations by St Clair Simmons

1891

tuitearte:

Nueva píldora: “Cristo muerto”, de Andrea Mantegna
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tuitearte:

Nueva píldora: “Cristo muerto”, de Andrea Mantegna

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minutemanworld:

Dr. Joseph Warren’s medical account book. 

Dr. Joseph Warren (June 11, 1741 – June 17, 1775) was an American doctor who played a leading role in American Patriot organizations in Boston in early days of the American Revolution, eventually serving as president of the revolutionary Massachusetts Provincial Congress. Warren enlisted Paul Revere and William Dawes on April 18, 1775, to leave Boston and spread the alarm that the British garrison in Boston was setting out to raid the town of Concord and arrest rebel leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams.

minutemanworld:

Dr. Joseph Warren’s medical account book. 

Dr. Joseph Warren (June 11, 1741 – June 17, 1775) was an American doctor who played a leading role in American Patriot organizations in Boston in early days of the American Revolution, eventually serving as president of the revolutionary Massachusetts Provincial Congress. Warren enlisted Paul Revere and William Dawes on April 18, 1775, to leave Boston and spread the alarm that the British garrison in Boston was setting out to raid the town of Concord and arrest rebel leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams.

(Source: drjosephwarren.com)

abystle:

Lepers Attended by Angels, Neapolitan School, 17th Century.

abystle:

Lepers Attended by Angels, Neapolitan School, 17th Century.

biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit

Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.

Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.

Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.